Setting up and winding your 30-hour or 8-day longcase clock

Setting up and winding your 30-hour or 8-day longcase clock
Posted on 26 November 2015

One of the many joys of owning an antique clock is being able to manually set it up and wind it every so often, as you can fully appreciate the craftsmanship and intellect put into the making of the clock, from the swinging of the pendulum to the turning of the hands. The process of setting up and winding your antique longcase clock will give you an opportunity to really get to know the ins and outs, quirks and charms and sheer perfection of your treasured piece. In... Read More »

The life of Larcum Kendall, the renowned marine chronometer maker

The life of Larcum Kendall, the renowned marine chronometer maker
Posted on 20 November 2015

Born in Charlbury, Oxfordshire in 1719, Larcum Kendall was perhaps best known for being commissioned to produce cheaper duplicates of John Harrison’s marine chronometers for navigation purposes, which were devised to solve the Longitude Problem. Following his apprenticeship with London watchmaker John Jeffreys, Kendall set up his own business in 1742, working with Thomas Mudge to make watches and also working for the renowned watch and clock maker George... Read More »

An introduction to the Tavern or Act of Parliament clock

An introduction to the Tavern or Act of Parliament clock
Posted on 11 November 2015

Updated 14th June 2017 The tavern clock is a long, weight driven wall clock which featured a large wooden, painted or lacquered dial, that was easily visible from a distance. Designed for use in public buildings such as taverns and inns, both the dials and the trunks of tavern clocks were often highly decorated, coming in shapes of numerous kinds including square, round and shield-shaped. Many were painted black, but some examples were decorated with chinoiserie, scro... Read More »

Setting up and reading your antique barometer: a beginners’ guide

Setting up and reading your antique barometer: a beginners’ guide
Posted on 03 November 2015

Although many people invest in an antique barometer for its historical and aesthetic value, barometers are useful even today for helping to predict the incoming weather. Barometers were designed as devices used to measure air pressure, with the oldest examples, mercury barometers, using the height of mercury within a glass tube to measure the air pressure in millibars. Changes in air pressure accompany changing weather, so, as a result, baro... Read More »

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