ROBERT SEIGNIOR. A very rare Charles II period floral marquetry, walnut and green bone inlaid 8-Day longcase clock of beautiful proportions and colour. (London, )

ROBERT SEIGNIOR. A very rare Charles II period floral marquetry, walnut and green bone inlaid 8-Day longcase clock of beautiful proportions and colour.
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ROBERT SEIGNIOR. A very rare Charles II period floral marquetry, walnut and green bone inlaid 8-Day longcase clock of beautiful proportions and colour.

OriginLondon
Date1680 to 1685
A very rare Charles II period floral marquetry, walnut and green bone inlaid 8-Day longcase clock of beautiful proportions and colour.

The case is constructed primarily of oak and veneered with walnut and panels of floral marquetry with green bone inlays. The long grain trunk door mouldings are ebonised. Standing on bun feet the clock retains its original base and there is an ebonised lenticle to the trunk door. The hood is flanked by ebonised barley twist columns and there are beautiful walnut, floral marquetry and green bone inlays below the cornice and in each section around the hood door.

The 10 inch square brass dial is mounted with cherub and foliate brass corner spandrels and a silvered brass chapter ring. The dial centre is finely matted with shutters for the bolt and shutter maintaining power. There is also an aperture to view the day of the month above VI. The maker’s signature is inscribed Robert Seignior London on the dial plate below VI. The blued steel hands are finely pierced and faceted and there is a subsidiary seconds dial below XII o’clock.

The high quality 8-day duration movement has five ringed pillars and the hours are sounded on a bell via an outside locking plate.

Height: 77 ½ in (197 cm)
Width: 17 ½ in (44 cm)
Depth: 9 ¾ in (25 cm)

* Robert Seignior was born in 1645 and he became free of the Clockmakers’ Company in April 1667. He was called to account for ‘contemptible words’ he had used to and about Thomas Claxton, the Master. He was also fined 20 shillings in October 1671 for calling the Clockmakers ‘a company of cheating knaves.’

Among his apprentices were Thomas Cruttenden of York and Samuel Gascoigne. Interestingly, we recently had a longcase clock by the latter maker which was housed in an almost identical early walnut, marquetry and green bone inlaid 10 inch case. Only the second such case we have had in thirty years of handling them.

Robert Seignior was obviously highly regarded as a clockmaker despite his tempestuous nature. Circa 1673 – 1674 he was appointed King’s Clock and Watchmaker ‘without fee’ until the death or surrender of office of Edward East, who actually outlived him.

Upon Seigniour’s death in 1686, Daniel Quare took over his former premises in Exchange Alley in the parish of St Mary Woolnoth.

HW5775

Signed / Inscribed

Robert Seignior London