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DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277. A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock

DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277.  A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277.  A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277.  A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277.  A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock
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DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN LONDON N°277. A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock

Origin
London
Date
circa 1718

A fine George I period arched dial ebony veneered table clock by this eminent partnership.

The case has an inverted bell top with its original turned knopped brass carrying handle.  The ebony and brass mouldings are of particularly fine quality as are the finely carved ebony sound frets.  The overall proportions of the case are excellent.

The 6 inch arched brass dial has a very fine matted centre and the makers’ names along with the number 277 are engraved on a cartouche in the centre below the dummy pendulum aperture.  There is a calendar aperture below XII and a subsidiary dial for Rise/Fall in the arch.  The blued steel hands are finely wrought and the gilt corner spandrels are beautifully finished.

The foliate engraving of the exquisite backplate with its wheatear border has a cornucopia of flowers and the makers’ signatures Quare & Horseman, London 277 are set within a central cartouche.

The restored single fusee movement has five pillars, verge escapement and original pull quarter repeat on two bells.

Height: 15 ½ in (39.5 cm) excluding handle

Width: 9 ½ in (24 cm)

Depth: 6 ½ in (16.5 cm)

Daniel Quare was born circa 1647/48 and was one of the two or three most eminent early 18th century English clock and barometer makers. He was a Quaker who became Master of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1708. Stephen Horseman became his partner in the same year until Quare’s death in 1724. The business continued under Horseman’s direction until 1733 when it went bankrupt. This fine example of their joint work dates from about 1718.

 

Reference: B. Loomes, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World: Complete 21st Century Edition, p.634

                   Garnier and Carter, The Golden Age of English Horology pp 262-331

HW5971
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