Antique Clock Dealers and marine chronometer

THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock

THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock
NH01-2396-Thomas-Tompion.jpg

THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT. A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock

Origin
London
Date
circa 1680

A fine and rare previously unrecorded Charles II period pre-numbered month duration walnut veneered longcase clock by England’s greatest clockmaker.

The beautifully proportioned slim case is constructed primarily of oak and veneered with richly patinated walnut of excellent colour. It has a large early lenticle in the trunk door. The hood has barley twist turned walnut columns  and a walnut veneered frieze set below the cornice moulding.

The substantial early Tompion movement is of month duration with five latched finned pillars and latched dial feet. There is bolt and shutter maintaining power and the hours are sounded on a single bell via a small outside locking plate. There is a brass stabilizing bracket from the movement to the steel bracket on the backboard.

The 10 inch square brass dial is of good mellow colour with a matted centre and silvered chapter ring with Roman hour numerals. There is an aperture to view the day of the month below XII. The pierced and facetted steel pointers are of outstanding quality. The four gilt brass  corner spandrels are of the winged cherub variety and the maker’s signature Thomas Tompion Londini Fecit  is set below VI.

Overall the clock is in a fine state of preservation. The wheel work in the movement is in excellent condition. This clock retains its original seatboard and the movement is located with a brass fixing bracket to the steel backboard bracket where it lines up perfectly. The clock is also complete with its brass rod and brass bob pendulum and period brass cased month weights.

Date: circa 1680

 

Height: 77 in (195.5 cm)

Width: 17 in (43 cm)

Depth: 9 ¼ in (23.5 cm)

 

References:

Jeremy Evans, Thomas Tompion and the Three Crowns

Evans Carter Wright, Thomas Tompion 300 Years

R.W. Symonds, Thomas Tompion His Life and Work

 

 

THOMAS TOMPION 1639 - 1713

Thomas Tompion is the most highly respected English clockmaker.  Born at Ickwell Green, Bedfordshire in 1639 he moved to London in 1671 and became a free brother in the Clockmakers’ Company. In 1674, he established his business at the sign of the Dial and Three Crowns in Water Lane, now called Whitefriars Street. There he met Dr Robert Hooke, an eminent physicist and mathematician, who exchanged ideas with him in the early part of his career when he was gaining commissions for some of his most important clocks and scientific instruments.   Through this association Tompion came to the notice of Charles II and from that time he held an unrivalled position in English Horology.

In 1695 George Graham joined Tompion and married his niece.  In 1701 Tompion took Edward Banger into partnership, another niece’s husband, who had previously been his apprentice.  They broke up acrimoniously in 1707 and Graham was then made a full partner. Clocks signed by both Tompion and Graham are very rare.

In 1703 Tompion was elected Master of the Clockmakers’ Company.  He is known to have made about 650 clocks, approximately 16-20 clocks a year.  Sometime between 1680 and 1685 he devised a numbering system for his clocks and watches which go up to 542. This was continued after Tompion's death by his successor George Graham. Tompion died many years later in 1713 and as a mark of his greatness he is buried in Westminster Abbey.

 

Read More Close

Recently Viewed Pieces